Am I an Anti-Semite?

It’s often the same people who are putting up violent, hysterical posts about Muslims, who are also posting about anti-Semitism in the Labour Party Continue reading Am I an Anti-Semite?

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Pixi Morgan

Peacenik Pixi Morgan was at the vanguard of rebel society: Nomad, musician, protestor and punk, pagan. Christopher Stone sheds light on a bonafide fire starter, the frondeur spirit of nonconformity which characterised his existence now permeating coffeehouses and hipster hangouts throughout the land. Interview by Saira Viola Read the interview here: http://internationaltimes.it/pixi-morgan/ Continue reading Pixi Morgan

Stonehenge Byway

I parked my camper between two thorn trees on the Drove, just passed the crossing where the old A344 used to run, and spent the night there. In the morning there was a frost, despite the lateness of the season, with a thin mist rising in the hollows as the sun began to warm the landscape. It was May the 1st: Beltane. The Drove—full title “the Netheravon Cattle Drove”, also known as Byway 12—is an ancient right of way cutting across Salisbury Plain. Historically it was probably used to drive cattle from the village of Netheravon to Salisbury Cattle Market: … Continue reading Stonehenge Byway

More about Pixi in the Trials of Arthur.

Not all the references to Pixi in the Trials of Arthur mention his name. The following is an extract from Chapter 18: Camelot (Of Cabbages and Kings). It describes life on a protest site, but actually refers to two incidents in which I observed Pixi, neither of which were on a protest site. The first took place in a friend’s front room, when Pixi stood up to recite a poem, accompanied by a woman who mimed to his words. Pixi did what he often did when he was performing: he invoked the fire. He asked us to imagine a scene … Continue reading More about Pixi in the Trials of Arthur.

Deaths of stars and friends remind us how fragile we are

There have been a number of high profile deaths in the news recently: starting with Lemmy from Motorhead, followed by David Bowie and ending with Alan Rickman last week. I was never a particular fan of any of them, but they served as a familiar backdrop to the ongoing story of my own life, so it will seem strange not to have them around any more. There was also the news of the death of my good friend Richard Stainton, which I first heard about on Facebook. What was particularly poignant about this for me is that I have recently … Continue reading Deaths of stars and friends remind us how fragile we are

Tory with a wilted rose

  You won’t be surprised to learn that I am supporting Jeremy Corbyn as the next leader of the Labour Party. He’s not really a “hard-left extremist”, despite what the media tells you. He is an old fashioned social democrat, like the Labour government of 1945, which brought us the National Health Service and the welfare state, or like current governments in the Scandinavian countries, which have some of the highest standards of living in the world. The only reason he can be portrayed as an extremist is that politics have moved so far to the right in the last thirty … Continue reading Tory with a wilted rose

Who’s really profiting from post office’s loss?

I was on the telly last week. It was in episode 3 of the BBC2 series, Signed, Sealed and Delivered: Inside the Post Office, about the occupation of our Crown Post Office on the day the building closed down for redevelopment. A copy exists on YouTube if you want to watch it. I’m a bit-part player, that’s all. You see me carrying a bucket and then explaining what it will be used for. The programme also features Hugh Lanning, James Flanagan, and Brian Hitcham; plus the talented Justin Mitchell, playing a moving rendition of the Last Post on his bugle, … Continue reading Who’s really profiting from post office’s loss?