Airstrikes in Syria

Last week David Cameron presented the case for airstrikes in Syria.

He said: “Throughout Britain’s history we have been called on time and again to make the hardest of decisions in defence of our citizens and our country. Today one of the greatest threats we face to our security is the threat from Isil [Isis].”

I took the report from the Guardian website. You will notice that they felt the need to explain who Isil are by adding an alternative name in brackets. This is just in case there might be some confusion.

The group are also known as Daesh by Middle Eastern commentators, and as Islamic State by themselves.

The United States is already bombing them, as is France, Russia, and the Syrian government. Also fighting them on the ground are Hezbollah, the Syrian Arab Army, the Iranians and various Kurdish factions.

The Kurds are considered to be terrorists by Turkey, who are bombing the Kurds even as the Kurds are fighting Isil. Hezbollah are also called terrorists by the United States and Israel.

The reason that Cameron wants to bomb Syria is that Isil claimed responsibility for the attacks in Paris on November 13th.

However, the people who committed the atrocity were from Belgium, not from Syria.

Also involved in the war are the al Nusra Front, an al Qaeda affiliate, and the Free Syrian Army, along with a rag-bag collection of mercenaries, crazies and veterans from earlier wars in Libya and Iraq, which we helped to start.

There may be as many as 120 different groups operating in Syria, all of whom would be called terrorists if they were doing what they are doing on the streets of Western cities; as it is we call them allies and number them amongst the 70,000 troops on the ground Cameron has stated will be mobilised to defeat Isil.

Many of them are jihadist groups hardly distinguishable from Isil.

Meanwhile Turkey downed a Russian fighter jet after it crossed briefly into Turkish airspece. Turkey is a member of NATO and a key American ally.

Russia has accused Turkey of aiding Isil.

Yesterday (December 2nd 2015) Britain carried out the first airstrikes in Syria after MPs voted in favour of military action.

So, to clarify:

We are bombing the people of one country, because people from a second country attacked people in a third.

Fortunately we are able to differentiate the good terrorists from the bad terrorists.

Half of the world is also bombing, but no one can agree who the enemy is, let alone what to call them.

Does anyone expect a good result from this?

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